Photo of teacher in Kakuma

Expanding Access Improving Quality Transforming Lives

Education has an unparalleled ability to open doors, create opportunities and change the way we think.  At Windle, education is our passion - from primary schools in remote villages to universities with a global reputation for excellence.

"Education is a human right with immense power to transform.” Kofi Annan

Scholarships

Through sponsoring refugees and others affected by conflict in Africa at secondary, vocational and tertiary level, the Trust is developing the technical expertise and professional skills to strengthen institutions, diminish gender-based inequalities and reduce the risks of social division.

Latest News

Participants of the 7-week training course for South Sudan Primary Level English Language teachers take part of an activity at the Multi Service Training Centre in Juba, South Sudan. The course focussed on developing teaching resources for primary school teachers that reflect the national curriculum and  context.

South Sudan is the world’s newest country, but it has inherited an education system that is in desperate need of renewal and reform. One aspect of that process of renewal is the adoption of English as the language of instruction for all subjects from grade 4 at primary school.  Teachers need good linguistic abilities to understand and deliver the curriculum – but many primary school teachers are untrained or poorly trained and have limited proficiency in English.

Rukia Yacoub

The new Representative and Country Director of the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) for Ghana, Ms Rukia Yacoub has assumed office.  

She brings to her post, a wealth of experience in implementing, managing and coordinating humanitarian and development programmes, both in least developed and lower-middle income countries.

Secondary Education in South Sudan: A Neglected Priority

South Sudan has the lowest secondary enrolment rates in the world – just 5% of young people go on to join secondary schools. A staggering 95% never get the chance to complete their basic education.   Even worse, 5% is an average – for girls and in some states the percentage will be less than half that figure. It is WTI’s view that unless there is a concerted and sustained programme of collective action, there is no likelihood of significant positive change in the next five years.